roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

This is brilliant. Thresholds are powerful.

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

This is brilliant. Thresholds are powerful.

(via lupinatic)

abandonedography:

Though it’s easy to crack jokes about Detroit’s downfall from afar, it doesn’t change the fact that there are very real people forced to look on as the place they call home slowly descends into decay. One of the most poignant depictions of this has come from none other than Google Maps.

Using Google Street View Time Machine, Alex Asup, a chief product officer at LOVELAND Technologies, has been documenting the neglect of the Detroit Metro’s some 78,000 houses.

The photos of these houses become even more striking when you realize that this extreme transformation really only takes place over a period of a few years, from 2009 to 2013. While it will almost certainly take quite a bit longer than that, hopefully one day, we’ll be able to look back again, this time at a city rising from the ruins. (via Gizmodo)

Do Not Rest - Nat Cheshire

His speech from Semi-Permanent Auckland 2014. I think this guy has unmatched passion for this city.

(Source: vimeo.com)

(via sweethomestyle)

architizer:

These are some of our favorite bizarre hybrids, naked buildings, and uncomfortable situations caused by the construction process. The ones above belong to Calatrava and Gehry. Read more

abandonedography:

Abandoned shopping center in Lyon, France - Wim Koopman

abandonedography:

Abandoned shopping center in Lyon, France - Wim Koopman

archatlas:

Interiors

Interiors is a film and architecture journal in which films are analyzed and diagrammed in terms of space. Interiors presents a discussion about films in terms of architectural space, focusing on the use of space in cinema.

(via archidose)

ryanpanos:

Paradoxical Monuments | Renato Nicolodi | Socks Studio

Renato Nicolodi is a Belgian artist who constructs paradoxical monuments, works not intended to commemorate an event or a person, but built only for the sake of themselves. Apart from realized concrete sculptures, the artist is working on a series of rendering and models to move on to the scale of the architectural space: these series look for a timeless aesthetics and appear as a question: freed from content and function, what does a space look like? To answer that, the artist integrates a multiplicity of visual references from the past, from classical to modern examples, striving to get to the purity of forms, the mathematical precision, the monumental scale.

(via spatula)

architizer:

Happy 113th Birthday to Louis Khan! Sincerely, Architizer

architizer:

Happy 113th Birthday to Louis Khan! Sincerely, Architizer

royaltyspeaking:

In English- Crown Prince Frederik giving a tour to a CNN reporter of his and Mary’s newly renovated home in Amalienborg palace